Joint Waldorf 2020 Conference

Save the date for June 22-25, 2020, in Chicago!

This conference, jointly sponsored by AWSNA, the Alliance and WECAN, closes the year’s activities in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Waldorf Education. It will share the lessons learned up to the present and set the stage for the next 100 years of collaboration within the movement.  

Seeding the Future: “Learn to Change the World” Trailer

The world gets better one person and one action at a time. “Seeding the Future” provides a glimpse into the principles of Waldorf education, an education that fosters concern for others, connection to the world, and the capacity to be in service to society. This video short is a trailer to the international film, “Learn to Change the World”

As a result, there will not be a separate national Alliance conference in the Winter of 2020.

We warmly encouraging your school to get involved in Waldorf 100 activities and plans for celebrations as part of the 2019-2020 school year. This past year most schools have been participating in postcard exchanges with schools across the globe, giving a unique perspective on mapping the world.

In addition to local celebrations, recorded interviews about Waldorf education are being collected though the Waldorf Chronicles program, additional efforts at community engagement are being encouraged through Hand-in Hand, and an environmental focus is being brought through the GreenBee initiative.


Other videos – 100th ANNIVERSARY OF WALDORF EDUCATION

ANNUAL NATIONAL CONFERENCE


Eventbrite - 2019 Alliance Annual Conference

Mark your calendars for the  2019 Alliance National Conference to be held for a second year at George Washington Carver High School in Sacramento.

We will be addressing the theme of Widening the Circle for a third and final year and are excited to pick up crucial themes of diversity, inclusion, and access to our education.

It requires courage to develop an alternative path on behalf of our children. Join us to explore the importance of inclusive, accessible whole-child education for all children. Participants are invited to reflect and to engage around topics of equity, race, inclusion and the policies needed to support Waldorf education in the public sector.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS:

Dr. Jonathan Raymond, former superintendent of Sacramento City Unified school District, and author of Wildflowers. Dr. Raymond will address the perseverance and strategies needed to establish and sustain our schools and the importance of whole-child education for every child.

Luis Versalles, of The Pacific Education group will lead us in an exploration of our inner beliefs and attitudes about race, equity, and inclusion. His work focuses on helping educators to engage in and sustain conversations about race.

Spring Board Meeting in Monterey

Front row from left to right:  Mary Rudd, Helene Brodsky-Blake, Cassandra Bridge, Mary Goral, Rainbow Rosenbloom and Charles Burkam. Back row from left to right:  Victoria Temple, Chamomile Nusz, Liz Beaven, Daniel Bittleston, and Chris Topham.

 

 

The Alliance Board of Directors and Advisory Board members met for the annual Spring board meeting to guide the work of the Alliance into the 2018/19 school year.

 

Items on the agenda included a review of all Alliance work, a focus on the ongoing Path of Membership process, and a review of the status of the first schools to complete the process:  Desert Marigold School in Phoenix, AZ and Sebastopol Charter School in Sebastopol, CA.

 

Also, Mary Rudd was appointed to join the Alliance Board as a new member at this gathering.  Welcome, Mary!

 

 

2018 Conference
at Carver High School

Featured

 

To Access the Conference Brochure for Details

 

The Alliance’s 2018 conference took place over MLKing Jr. weekend on January 12-14, continues the ongoing conversation about widening the circle of students served by Public Waldorf education through a deepening of our knowledge and experience with culturally relevant practices.  This year keynote speaker Kim John Payne will ask the question: Who’s in the Classroom?  in order to address the needs of diverse learners.  Kim is also offering a Pre-Conference Workshop on Friday afternoon on The Three Streams of Healthy School Culture that involves building an integrated support process for social inclusion, restorative discipline and learning support.

 

On Friday evening, we offered an interactive evening of presentation and conversation on the surprises, opportunities and challenges of our Expanding Field of Public Waldorf Education.  A free Post-Conference Workshop with Charles Burkam took place on the Steps to Membership: Learning Who We Are on Sunday Afternoon as we move toward the final from and launch of the Path of Membership process.

 

Our traditional Sunday morning Rudi Talks offered A Report on Current Public Waldorf Research by three educators in the field.   An Alliance Annual General Meeting will also take place at the close of the conference on Sunday afternoon to which everyone is welcome.

 

A host of exciting Workshops and Breakout Groups took place at our new Public Waldorf school location.  We gratefully thank the staff and students of  George Washington Carver High School of Arts & Sciences, for their support making this conference possible.

Public Waldorf℠ Education
in the News

Alliance Board

Alliance board and advisory board members gather as President Shanna Mall signs the historic agreement with AWSNA at the George Washington Carver School of Arts & Sciences in Sacramento, CA on March 27, 2015.

On March 27, 2015 the Association for Waldorf Schools of North America (AWSNA) and the Alliance for Public Waldorf Education (the Alliance) announced a collaborative licensing agreement, which grants the use of the service mark Public Waldorf to the Alliance.

 

Together, both organizations are forging a new relationship based on their common foundation and perspective on what is best for children. Jointly their goal is to strengthen Waldorf Education and ensure its availability and accessibility to the next generation.

 

Waldorf educators, whether they work in independent or in public schools, hold Rudolf Steiner’s goal for education to be eloquently expressed in this quote: “Our highest endeavor must be to develop free human beings who are able of themselves to impart purpose and meaning to their lives.” In all of Waldorf Education lives the hope of providing new ideas for cultural and educational renewal. It is with tremendous excitement and hope that both associations look towards a future of working collaboratively in service to the children of North America.

 

For more information, we share here the text of the Joint Letter that spells out the terms of the license agreement, a Memorandum of Understanding that spells out how AWSNA and the Alliance intend to work together, and a Core Principles document with commentary on how Waldorf education is expressed in public Waldorf charter schools.

 

We invite you to share our enthusiasm for this new development in our movement for educational renewal!

 

JOINT LETTER

 

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

 

CORE PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC WALDORF EDUCATION IN THE US

 

* Public Waldorf Education is a service mark of the Association of Waldorf Schools of North America and used pursuant to a license.

Conference Highlights from Our Conference Chair

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From Our Conference Chair

We Have the Will to Work—Educating the Will for the 21st Century and Beyond
By Marianne Kennedy

Over 300 conference attendees were treated to a winter weekend feast this year at the Alliance Annual National Conference held at Rudolf Steiner College. Of course, Shiloh’s meals were wonderful, but I am referring to the feast of collegial sharing of a wealth of knowledge and experience brought to us by our esteemed keynote speaker, Bente Goldstein. Bente, herself a Waldorf school graduate, shared with us her observations of the development of will in children and its importance to each of us individually and globally.

 

Over three days of morning lectures and the Sunday Plenum, Bente led us through Rudolf Steiner’s theories of will, the importance of strong will development, and advice to teachers on how to develop and strengthen the will of our students. Mrs Goldstein’s presentations were rich in theoretical, philosophical and practical content.

 

Bente’s personal warmth and lively talks led the way for the exciting workshops and breakout sessions held on Saturday. Eleven workshops led by teachers and administrators in Waldorf education ranged from Digital Media Literacy to Handwork, Painting and Understanding Children with Attention, Learning and Behavioral Challenges. Twelve breakout sessions ranged from meetings with teachers in the same grades to an Anthroposophical study of the Seven Levels of Will. The rooms were filled to capacity with energy and enthusiasm.

 

The conference offered morning eurythmy with Cynthia Hoven and daily singing with Eva Cranstoun. On Friday evening, the attendees were treated to a folk dance led by Donna Burgess. Saturday evening began with a beautiful eurythmy performance by the Credo Rose Eurythmy Group from Credo High School. This was followed by a fireside chat with Betty Staley and Joan Almon. The evening ended with an hilarious Waldorf Password game led by members of the Alliance Board and Advisory Board.

 

It was a wonderful weekend to meet teachers from many states and experience levels. For some teachers, this conference came at the beginning of the Waldorf Teacher Training. While for many experienced Waldorf teachers, this conference offered an opportunity to be refreshed half-way through the school year with new songs, games and ideas to bring back to their classrooms.

 

I enjoyed hearing from many of you during the weekend about what you were enjoying about the conference. It is always designed with the teachers in mind. As Victoria Temple and I and the rest of the Conference Committee begin our planning for January 2016, we will have in mind your conference evaluation comments and the ideas you brought to us during the weekend. But even more importantly, I will have the image of us all standing in a large circle around Stegman Hall singing, “To Wonder At Beauty,” with tears in many eyes and warmth in our hearts for each other and the valuable work that we have the honor and ability to do. I look forward to seeing you again next January.